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Babe Ruth Major League Debut – July 11, 1914

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Babe Ruth pitched six strong and one not so strong inning in his major league debut against the Cleveland Indians on July 11, 1914.
The Boston Globe Headline read:
RUTH LEADS RED SOX TO VICTORY: PITCHER RUTH WARMLY WELCOMED BY FANS, BUT CLEVELAND FINDS HIM VERY COLD Southpaw Displays High Class In Game Against Cleveland.

Still going by the name George Ruth, the young Red Sox pitcher held Cleveland to one run and only five hits through the first six innings, as the Sox jumped to a
3-1 lead. The Indians roughed him in the seventh, scoring two earned runs and tying the game. In the bottom of the seventh (Get this!, Duffy Lewis came in to pinch hit for Ruth. The Sox managed to score a run in the seventh enabling Ruth to get the win in his first start.

Babe Ruth Wikimedia Commons

Babe Ruth Wikimedia Commons

Last month, one of ten Babe Ruth Rookie Cards was sold for $450,000

The sports memorabilia world is still buzzing over an auction result that can rightly be considered an upset. For the first time ever, a 1914 Baltimore News Babe Ruth rookie card sold for more money than the famed T206 Honus Wagner.

It happened at Robert Edward Auctions (REA), where one of only about 10 known examples of the Ruth card sold for a record price of $450,300. That was nearly $48,000 more than a 1909 T206 Wagner, which was offered in the same grade and was once the subject of an FBI “card hunt” after it was stolen from a restaurant display in the 1990s.
Bleacherreport.com

The Babe Ruth Birth Place and Sports Legends Museum in Baltimore, has another one of the Babe Ruth rookie cards.

Carl Hubbell Strikes Out Five Hall of Famers in a Row – July 10, 1934

Babe Ruth Sold for $100K in 1920. His Shirt sold for $4MM in 2012

First All-Star Game Babe Ruth Homers July 6, 1933

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First All-Star Game Babe Ruth Homers July 6, 1933

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The First All-Star Game was played in 1933 at Comiskey Park, in Chicago. Never intended to be an annual event, its whole purpose was to lift attendance at the struggling Chicago Worlds Fair.

While the “Century of Progress” World’s Fair was in full swing, anevent occurred on this day that changed baseball history: the first All-Star game. A few months earlier, Chicago Mayor Edward J. Kelly had gone to Col. Robert R. McCormick, publisher of the Tribune, with an idea. He wanted to arrange a sports event as an adjunct to the fair. “`We’ve got the man right here,’ McCormick said.

Ten minutes later, sports editor Arch Ward was in McCormick’s office,” as Ward’s biographer, Tom Littlewood, recounted the meeting.
Ward knew what he wanted: a matchup of the best players in the American and National Leagues.
Chicago Tribune

The Giants legendary skipper, John McGraw, came out of retirement to manage the National League. Connie Mack was at the helm for the American League. The National League lineup included Hall of Famers Frankie Frisch, Gabby Hartnett, Carl Hubbell, Chuck Klein, Bill Terry, Pie Traynor, and Paul Waner.

If you think that lineup wasn’t too shabby, compare it to the American League’s which featured Joe Cronin, Bill Dickey, Jimmy Foxx, Lou Gehrig, Charlie Gehringer, Lefty Gomez, Lefty Grove, Tony Lazzari, Al Simmmons, and oh yeah, a 38-year-old veteran outfielder by the name of Babe Ruth. The old boy hit a second inning two run homer that put the American League ahead 3-0. The game ended with the AL on top, 4-2.

Babe Ruth Major League Debut – July 11, 1914

Babe Ruth Sold for $100K in 1920. His Shirt sold for $4MM in 2012

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Babe Ruth Caught Stealing to End World Series – October 10, 1926

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Babe Ruth Caught Stealing to end the 1926 World Series

Babe Ruth Caught Stealing to end the 1926 World Series
source:WikiCommons

Babe Ruth – You know about his 60 home runs in 1927, his 714 career homers, and the one in 1932 where he allegedly called the shot after he met the little kid in the hospital. But did you know that he was the goat of the 1926 World Series?

The Yankees were playing the Cardinals in game seven at Yankee Stadium. New York was batting in the bottom of the ninth inning, trailing 3-2. Facing Cardinals’ reliever Pete Alexander, the Yankees’ Earl Combs started the inning by grounding out to third. Mark Koenig followed him and also grounded out to third. Then Babe Ruth stepped to the plate. At that point he was probably the leading contender to be the series MVP. He had hit three home runs in game four, and another in the third inning of game seven.

Ruth was 6-20 for the series, as he stepped to the plate. He had also walked 10 times including three previous at-bats in game seven. His on base percentage was .516. After running a 3-2 count, Alexander walked Ruth one last time.

And then as H.I. Phillips wrote in the Boston the Globe the next day –
The end came a moment later when the Babe was caught stealing second. It was a case of the behemoth mistaking itself for a gazelle.

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Babe Ruth Hits 60th Home Run – September 30, 1927

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Babe Ruth Breaks his own record Hitting his 60th home run of the season, 1927

Babe Ruth Breaks his own record Hitting his 60th home run of the season, 1927
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Babe Ruth broke the single season home run record in 1919, 1920, 1921 and 1960

When Babe Ruth hit 59 home runs in 1921, he broke his own record of 54 homers, which he had set in 1920. His 1920 record also broke a record that Ruth already held. He hit 29 homers in 1919, the year that is generally considered to be the last of the “dead ball era.”

After 1921, the Yankee slugger went five whole seasons without breaking the home run record, in fact 47 homers was the best he could manage from 1922 through 1926. Then on September 30, 1927, he hit the his 60th home run of the season and set a record that would hold up until Roger Maris hit 61 in 1961.

Here’s what they wrote about it, back in the day

The Washington Post:

Babe Ruth has confirmed his right to be known as the mightiest hitter that baseball has ever known. Yesterday he hammered out his sixtieth home run of the present season, surpassing his own record of 59 in a playing year, which he established in 1921… Never has any sport produced a hero who has attracted as much attention as Ruth, whose renown lies in the fact that he can hit a ball harder and farther than any other living mortal. He has been written about until he is almost a legendary figure. He receives in payment more than any other player, a salary comparable to the one enjoyed by the President of the United States.

And the New York Times:

Babe Ruth scaled the hitherto unattained heights yesterday. Home run 60 a terrific smash off the southpaw pitching of Zachary, nestled in the Babe’s favorite spot in the right field bleachers, and before the roar had ceased it was found that this drive not only had made home run history but also was the winning margin in a 4 to 2 victory over the Senators… When the Babe stepped to the plate in that momentous eighth inning the score was deadlocked, Koenig was on third base, the result of a triple. One man was out and all was tense. It was the Babe’s fourth trip to the plate daring the afternoon, a base on balls and two singles resulting on his other visits plateward. The first Zachary offering was a fast one, which sailed over for a called strike. The next was high. The Babe took a vicious swing at the third pitched ball and the bat connected with a crash that was audible in all parts of the stand. It was not necessary to follow the course of the ball. The boys in the bleachers indicated the route of the record homer. It dropped about half way to the top. Boys, No. 60 was some homer, a fitting wallop to top the Babe’s record of 59 in 1921.

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Babe Ruth Sold for $100K January 3, 1920. His Shirt sold for $4MM in 2012

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January 3, 1920, Announcement – – Babe Ruth Sold to Yankees by Red Sox for $125,000.

The Mitchell Archives
Babe Ruth Sold to The Yankees

In 1919 Babe Ruth smashed the major league home run record, hitting 29 round-trippers. He broke the record held by Gavvy Cravath, who hit 24 for the Phillies in 1915. Before Ruth hit his 29 homers in 1919, the American League record was only 12.

From The NY Times Babe Ruth of the Boston Red Sox, baseball’s super slugger, was purchased by the Yankees yesterday for the largest cash sum ever paid for a player. The New York club paid Harry Frazee of Boston $125,000 for the sensational batsman who last season caused such a furore in the national game by batting out twenty-nine home runs, a new record in long distance clouting.
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From the Miami NewsThe most popular indoor sport in New York today was guessing how much the New York Americans (Yankees) paid for George (Babe) Ruth, the home run monarch. The nearest approach to anything of an official nature was the smiling admission of Col. Jacob Ruppert, the Yankees president, that he understood that an offer of $100,000 for Ruth was refused by Harry Frazee, of the Boston Club. Read more


Popularly held myth that Red Sox Owner Harry Frazee used the Money from the Sale of Babe Ruth to finance the Broadway Musical, “No No Nanette”, is debunked

From Americanpopularculture.com In 1917, Broadway producer Harry Frazee bought the Red Sox. On January 3, 1920, he made baseball’s most notorious swap, sending the Babe to the Yankees for $100,000 in cash and a $300,000 loan. This move started the alleged “Curse of the Bambino,” a spell supposedly responsible for the sequence of calamities since then. Legend has it that he made the deal to finance the hit show No, No Nanette.
Not true. At the time of the Ruth trade. the show’s author, Vincent Youmans, was an unknown rehearsal pianist, and the musical had not been written. No, No Nanette first appeared on Broadway more than five years after the trade, and the two had no direct connection.

The Curse of the Bambino is Also a Myth

The “Curse” rose to prominence back in 1990, when Boston Globe columnist Dan Shaughnessy penned a historical book about the Red Sox. Looking for a way to spruce up 70 years of rehashed stories, Shaughnessy borrowed a Scituate preacher’s theory that the Red Sox had been haunted ever since they sold Babe Ruth to the Yankees in 1920. It was a cute, efficient way to weave together every Sox-related heartbreak over the past eight decades. It also placed Shaughnessy on the map, made him a best-selling author and put his kids through college (to steal a line from local radio personality Gerry Callahan).
From ESPN.com Read more


Babe Ruth’s Jersey Sells in 2012 For 40 Times What Babe Sold For

Babe Ruth Jersey Sold for $4.4MM

A New York Yankees road jersey worn by the Sultan of Swat in the 1920s sold for a whopping $4.4 million, setting a world record for any sports memorabilia item.
California-based SCP Auctions handled the sale of George Herman “Babe” Ruth’s jersey, which officially came in at $4,415,658.
A New York Yankees road jersey worn by the Sultan of Swat in the 1920s sold for a whopping $4.4 million, setting a world record for any sports memorabilia item. California-based SCP Auctions handled the sale of George Herman “Babe” Ruth’s jersey, which officially came in at $4,415,658.
From the NY Daily News, Read more

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